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Roma people inclusion

by Stefan Alievikj on 4th May, 2012 at 2:48 PM CEST

Roma people or further more known as Romani, or Gipsies are ethnic group, mostly living in Europe. They originate from the Indian subcontinent; highly despersed in the world, they are inhabitants in USA, Brazil and other American countries as well.

The Roma people face up with highs rate of social exclusion. For many decades and even centuries, Roma people are living in the margins of towns and cities in hardly satisfactory conditions.

Roma flag, 1933. Image by: Wikimedia

Their situation is especially deprived in South-Eastern Europe where they are treated as second-rate citizens. In Skopje, the capital of Macedonia, you can see Roma people making shelters under bridges, stairs and other hidden places. Their shelters could be found in the city centre even, just minutes away from the city square. They come begging from all sides and even you can find them sleeping on the main streets’ pavements sometimes. People tend to ignore these images. As humans, we have developed this sense of neglecting such uncanny scenes, which is the indifference to human suffering that we tend to share.

Image by: Borjan Gorgiev, Macedonia

Roma people, firstly suffer from improper healthcare and secondly they are not properly incorporated within the educational system, thus their education is at very low level. The Macedonian Ministry of Labor and Social Policy  has a special strategy for the development of the Roma society in Macedonia. With this strategy, they encourage local municipalities to take a step ahead and develop clear and specific purposes. The strategy suggests that each Romani district should have own hospitals or clinics. Though the strategy is brought up and voted in January, 2005, there are hardly any changes seen in Roma's people lifestyles. We can even set down that this marginalized social group is not quite aware of their own rights.

Furthermore, they are categorized as weak population which lacks out good economical power. 

Image by: Borjan Gorgiev, Macedonia

How would you feel if you were in their shoes? People often say:"I won't give them money for free. Let them find something to work." Well, the facts are - hardly anyone will give them job because most of Roma people are not at all educated. Maybe, that picture today is slightly better. I can see some Roma people with satisfactory work, but just "slightly better" is not enough at all.

It leads me to the question: what is similar to the Roma people image in other countries?

Stefan Alievikj and Action Team Writers #8

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KEDEI INAH

KEDEI INAH

Nice one and I feel their pain but the society works is different in some aspect. And for me, this kind of image is common in my area.

7th May, 2012 @ 11:28 PM CEST

Stefan Alievikj

Stefan Alievikj | C:F staff

I can only suppose that Kedei... and it is frustrating how the society works.

8th May, 2012 @ 1:37 AM CEST

Samuel Duru

Samuel Duru | Action team

Stefan, the story of the Roma People as depicted in your article is a reality in our society. Images similar to thsoe of the Roma People is prevalent here, especially in the informal settlements. So many people are alienated and excluded from the rest of their people because they belong to a minority group. Stereotyping is rife in our world today, and it's very painful. Much money is spent on wars and its likes, while the minorities suffer perpetually.

11th May, 2012 @ 11:35 AM CEST

Stefan Alievikj

Stefan Alievikj | C:F staff

Yes Sam, that's the sad truth...
Who are the minors in your country? You can freely discuss that here and I want to get some information about other minorities.

p.s. I think this article was for WHT section, not TOW

13th May, 2012 @ 1:33 PM CEST

Samuel Duru

Samuel Duru | Action team

Stef, these people are scattered all over the country. They don't have a name per se, but they do exist. Article switched to it's proper place.

Cheers!

16th May, 2012 @ 11:39 AM CEST

Stefan Alievikj

Stefan Alievikj | C:F staff

Having no name is terrible phenomenon nowadays... it indicates the absence of identity as well. People in old days used to name random people as Barbarians. But who is the real Barbarian is the question!?

23rd May, 2012 @ 10:43 PM CEST

Halina Wojsław

Halina Wojsław

Thanks for this article, Stefan! I think it is a very important topic. I agree that it is wrong and harmful that people are prejudiced againts their Roma neighbours and feel distrustful towards them just because they are Roma.

However, I think that sadly it's not just due to the attitude of the non-Roma people that the Roma are at the social and economic margin of societies. I have a few Macedonian Roma friends, fantastic and very motivated for taking the future in their own hands university students and NGO activits. From them I have learned many sad facts about how numerous fake NGOs set up by Roma exploit the aid funds, receiving money for projects which never happen and thus undermining the credibility of the rest of the community. I heard form them a lot as well about how the Roma politicians in, for instance, Shuto Orizari, use their power just for getting their own families rich, without caring for the rest.

The problem of the Roma society (both in Macedonia and in Poland, and perhaps in other countries which I don't know as well) is in my oppinion the lack of solidarity and feeling of unity within the nation combined with lack of proper civic education and lack of wise leadership. And these are not things we (we-Polish, we-Macedonians etc.) can give them: the best we can do is educate the children, so that they have a chance to become wise leaders, good teamplayers and consius citizens without loosing their feeling of ethnical pride.

9th June, 2012 @ 4:21 PM CEST

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